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April 2005

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Comments

Lukinhas

Nate, when you word it that way, I am also unsure if I have ever lost any work baceuse spec work exists. I do think the profession of design is devalued by spec work, and so in that way, I may be charging less than I am worth, but can not be positive either way. There is a reason I don't enter any spec competitions though, they never make sense in the long run.You are also right that this was an uncomfortable show, even re-listening to it this morning. Next time we will speak all rainbows and puppies I hope.

Ravinder

Lack of respect for deacrcmoy, I agree. More importantly, IMO, lack of respect for free will: for Terri Schiavo's free will, here, in expressing her wishes. As she did. The GOP denies, in a startling moral and religious development, that Schiavo had a free will that she could express. She is, in fact, a possession: their possession. Her dad's possession. The letter writers' possession. Jeb Bush's possession.I use this term guardedly. IMO the clearest instance of free will being denied in human history is slavery. Terri Schiavo is now, quite precisely, a slave.

Gomercindo

A p.s. to my response above…Is this csetnot viewed as part of Obama's re-election campaign? The Federal Elections Commission contribution limit for an individual is $2,500. That means that whomever enters this csetnot must value their poster entry as less than $2,500. Otherwise, the contribution will be seen as excessive and unlawful, and must be returned. If the contribution of poster art is accepted and proven to be worth more than $2,500, it's a federal offense.Food for thought for those who would enter this csetnot.

Myrrh

This baby is not being starved or lianckg in medical care. The decision not to resucitate is far different from taking measures that will definitely lead to death. It is not easy for families to see loved ones die. The reader of this decision lacks details as to exact medical findings as to the baby's comfort,symptoms etc. If the baby dies, lack of resusitation is not the same as stopping basic life support. It is the decision to not attempt extraordinary means to prolong the inevitable. If the baby lives, it will continue to have basic care.

Luke

A lively dabtee indeed. It may have felt uncomfortable to be a part of the conversation, but as a listener, it seemed like a great back and forth discussion on this topic, where two different sides were both heard.As a designer who is new(er) to understanding the definition and effects of spec work, I found this episode very enjoyable, and I'm even more interested in seeing how this situation plays out in the upcoming weeks.

Truthe

, your next-to-last paragraph brgins me back to the side of not ignoring this contest, and adding my voice to the protestations. Donovan, your point of just not entering the spec competitions, in my opinion at least, is the seed that needs to sprout deep roots. If no one entered them, wouldn't they just cease to be?Keep up the good work guys; thumbs up to all three of you. Oh, and please—no rainbows or puppies.

Julie

Our daughter Hannah lives in a rtdsieneial care home run by Leonard Cheshire Disability. She is 23 years old, was born with peripheral neuropathy that lead to muscle weakness; she also has a minorcongenital heart defect. She started to walk late but a growth spurt at puberty, together with themuscle weakness led to deformities of the feet and scoliosis. The latter condition required twooperations to insert titanium rods into her back to stem the curvature of the spine. Since that time shehas been wheelchair bound and has developed epilepsy. She also has moderate learning difficultiesand is an elective mute.Despite her problems, she reads, uses a computer well, enjoys craft activities, going shopping and tothe cinema and theatre and attends college twice a week. The transport costs for these activities comeout of her DLA mobility component. She also uses it to pay for wheelchair insurance including third party cover (about a360 per year) and to purchase and maintain a manual wheelchair and might in the future need to purchase a powered wheelchair (at present supplied by the NHS, but this can vary depending on the Primary Care Trust). In addition, she pays a small contribution towards the running costs of a wheelchair accessible vehicle. Although we are pensioners, we have paid outright for this vehicle and its Road Tax so that we can bring her home at weekends and take her on family outings and holidays. A time will come when either we cannot afford such a vehicle or be able to drive it safely, so continuation of the Motability Scheme is vital for Hannah’s independence. Indeed several of her fellow residents have vehicles under this scheme which they will have to return should the mobility component disappear.If Hannah and her fellow residents lose the mobility component then she will have to find these mobilitycosts from her a322 per week Personal Expense Allowance. This already stretches to pay for toiletries,clothes, phone and Internet, share of TV license, social activities, college fees and holidays.

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